Pediatric/Geriatric Wellness Plans

Puppy and Kitten Care

 
Bringing a new puppy or kitten into your home is always something to celebrate. They add energy and fun and are a source of unceasing affection as they bond with you and your family.
 
However, new pets require a little extra attention to ensure they get a good, healthy start at life. This means that comprehensive physical exams from one of the veterinarians at Elmwood Animal Hospital at key developmental stages are essential. Any time that you get a new pet, it's important to schedule an appointment right away so that we may review their prior medical records and make timely recommendations for appropriate wellness care. 
 
Your first visits with your new puppy or kitten at Elmwood Animal Hospital are perhaps the most important. These initial visits are where you, one of our doctors and your pet first meet and begin to form the relationship that lasts throughout the life of your pet. We take plenty of time with these visits to give your puppy or kitten a thorough examination, talk with you about concerns you may have, offer health care and training advice, and more.
 
Some of the issues discussed during your kitten’s first visits include:
 
Diet discussion, including types of food that are best for cats' unique requirements. 
Litter and litter box discussion 
Behavior discussion 
Should my cat be allowed to go outdoors?
Spaying and neutering recommendations 
Declawing—Should I or shouldn't I? 
Vaccine protocol 
Discussion of pet health insurance. Should I get pet health insurance? What should I look for in a company? 
Microchipping - Should I get this done? When is the best time to do this? 
Fecal exam and treatment for worms and other intestinal parasites  
Testing for Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) 
Discussion about fleas (treatment and prevention) and heartworm disease
The complete physical exam which includes detection of potential congenital problems and anything else you may want to discuss. This is your new kitten and we're happy to answer any questions. 
 
Some of the issues discussed during your puppy’s first visits include:
 
Diet discussion, including types of food to feed and guidelines on feeding intervals and quantities 
Housetraining discussion 
Behavior discussion 
Spaying and neutering advice—Is this best for my dog? If I decide to spay/neuter, when is the best time to have this done? 
Formulation of an individualized vaccine protocol. 
Discussion on pet health insurance. Should I get pet health insurance? What should I look for in a company?
Discussion about heartworm, fleas, and ticks
Microchipping - Should I get this done? When is the best time to do this? 

Fecal exam and treatment for worms and other intestinal parasites

The complete physical exam which includes detection of potential congenital problems and anything else you may want to discuss. This is your new puppy and we're happy to answer any questions. 

 
 

Senior Care

 
Congratulations! By taking the time to learn more about the special needs of your senior aged pet, you have taken the first step toward providing the best care for your friend in his or her golden years. As with humans, pets in their senior years—those of about six years of age and older—begin to go through a gradual reduction of their physical capabilities. However, this process can be slowed and managed through proper veterinary care thereby offering your beloved pet an extended period of vitality and good health. Preventive care tailored to your pet's age, lifestyle, risk factors and other elements can help prevent common diseases or detect them at early and easily treatable stages.
 
There is also an important role for you to play as your pet's primary caregiver. While you cannot control age-related decline, you can influence your pet's activity level, living conditions, access to quality senior veterinary care, and daily nutrition. With your veterinarian's help, you can manage these factors in order to prolong your pet's good health, vitality, and increase his or her well-being, even as his or her pace slows a bit.
 
However, the best time to begin your pet's senior care program and recognize the need for a little extra TLC is well before age-related conditions begin to set in.
 

Your Pet’s Senior Care

 
Senior Wellness Exams
This semi-annual visit includes a routine physical examination, gives you an opportunity to discuss concerns regarding your pet's age, and may include specialized lab work to detect the early signs of disease processes. Our doctors tailor these exams and tests to your pet's age, breed, lifestyle and physical condition in order to best meet his or her health needs. Because a mature pet's condition can change significantly in a short period of time, we recommend that families bring in their senior pets approximately every 6 months. 
 
Dental Care
Unfortunately, dental disease is all too common in pets, especially older pets, and it represents a significant systemic health risk. Because bacteria in the mouth can enter the bloodstream and be passed to other organs, periodontal disease has been found to have associations with kidney, liver, lung, and heart disease. Additionally, pets in oral distress will often have difficulty or discomfort when eating. Pet's Friend Animal Clinic recommends regular dental exams and cleanings for all pets, but especially those in their senior years.
 
Skin Conditions
As with humans, aging causes your pet's skin to become more susceptible to a range of medical issues as well as become less elastic and heal more slowly. A range of dermatological conditions can cause changes, such as hair loss and new growths; therefore, we recommend regular examinations of your pet's skin and hair, especially if you notice itching, hair loss, or painful areas. 
 
Home Care
During your pet's senior exams your veterinarian will discuss with you ways that you can help maintain your older pet's health at home. These suggestions include:
 
Avoid excessive weight gain. Your veterinarian may recommend an exercise program as well as a special senior pet food.
Keep your pet's living and areas clean, dry and warm at all times.
If possible, regularly check your pet's mouth for reddened gums, loose teeth or unusual swellings. Check eyes for redness, unusual cloudiness, discomfort, and discharge. Check ears for wax build-up, discharge or unusual odors.
Thoroughly groom and inspect your older pet's skin regularly. Look for lumps, bumps, and wounds.
If your older pet's eyesight is impaired, avoid relocating furniture and changing his or her surroundings. Also, try not to drastically change your pet's daily routine.
Any changes associated with eating, drinking or elimination should be noted and discussed with your veterinarian, as these may be manifestations of a disease.
Take your older pet for regular senior checkups, even if he or she seems to be well. It is always easier and less expensive to prevent a problem rather than treat a problem.
Discuss your pet's diet. Many "treats" are high in sodium or fat; therefore, it is important to talk to your veterinarian about the source(s) of your pet's daily calories.
 
Your older pet is a real member of the family. With proper care and regular testing, your loyal companion should be able to live a long and healthy life.

Appointment request

Need an appointment with a vet in Buffalo? Requesting an appointment is now easier than ever. Fill out the form below and we'll contact you to find a time that fits your schedule.
Client Name*
Phone Number*
Email Address
Are you a current client?
Best time(s) to call?
Preferred Appt Date
Preferred Appt Time
Message
Pet Type